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Table of Contents

GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
Preamble
How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
1. Introduction
1.1 Caveats
1.2 Lisp History
1.3 Conventions
1.3.1 Some Terms
1.3.2 nil and t
1.3.3 Evaluation Notation
1.3.4 Printing Notation
1.3.5 Error Messages
1.3.6 Buffer Text Notation
1.3.7 Format of Descriptions
1.3.7.1 A Sample Function Description
1.3.7.2 A Sample Variable Description
1.4 Acknowledgements
2. The XEmacs Packaging System
3. An overview of the XEmacs Packaging System
3.1 The User View
3.2 The Library Maintainer View
3.2.1 Infrastructure
3.2.2 Control Files
3.2.3 Obtaining the XEmacs Packaging System and Required Utilities
3.2.4 The Package Release Engineer View
3.2.5 Libraries and Packages
3.2.6 Package Flavors
3.2.7 Package Distributions
3.2.8 Prerequisites for Building Source Packages
3.3 What You Can Do With Source Packages
4. `Makefile' targets
4.0.1 The targets that most people would be interested in would be:
5. Creating Packages:
6. package-info.in
7. `Makefile'
7.1 `package-compile.el'
7.2 Issues
8. Lisp Data Types
8.1 Printed Representation and Read Syntax
8.2 Comments
8.3 Primitive Types
8.4 Programming Types
8.4.1 Integer Type
8.4.2 Floating Point Type
8.4.3 Character Type
8.4.4 Symbol Type
8.4.5 Sequence Types
8.4.6 Cons Cell and List Types
8.4.6.1 Dotted Pair Notation
8.4.6.2 Association List Type
8.4.7 Array Type
8.4.8 String Type
8.4.9 Vector Type
8.4.10 Bit Vector Type
8.4.11 Function Type
8.4.12 Macro Type
8.4.13 Primitive Function Type
8.4.14 Compiled-Function Type
8.4.15 Autoload Type
8.4.16 Char Table Type
8.4.17 Hash Table Type
8.4.18 Range Table Type
8.4.19 Weak List Type
8.5 Editing Types
8.5.1 Buffer Type
8.5.2 Marker Type
8.5.3 Extent Type
8.5.4 Window Type
8.5.5 Frame Type
8.5.6 Device Type
8.5.7 Console Type
8.5.8 Window Configuration Type
8.5.9 Event Type
8.5.10 Process Type
8.5.11 Stream Type
8.5.12 Keymap Type
8.5.13 Syntax Table Type
8.5.14 Display Table Type
8.5.15 Database Type
8.5.16 Charset Type
8.5.17 Coding System Type
8.5.18 ToolTalk Message Type
8.5.19 ToolTalk Pattern Type
8.6 Window-System Types
8.6.1 Face Type
8.6.2 Glyph Type
8.6.3 Specifier Type
8.6.4 Font Instance Type
8.6.5 Color Instance Type
8.6.6 Image Instance Type
8.6.7 Toolbar Button Type
8.6.8 Subwindow Type
8.6.9 X Resource Type
8.7 Type Predicates
8.8 Equality Predicates
9. Numbers
9.1 Integer Basics
9.2 Rational Basics
9.3 Floating Point Basics
9.4 The Bignum Extension
9.4.1 Bignum Basics
9.4.2 Ratio Basics
9.4.3 Bigfloat Basics
9.4.4 Canonicalization and Contagion
9.4.5 Compatibility Issues
9.5 Type Predicates for Numbers
9.6 Comparison of Numbers
9.7 Numeric Conversions
9.8 Arithmetic Operations
9.9 Rounding Operations
9.10 Bitwise Operations on Integers
9.11 Standard Mathematical Functions
9.12 Random Numbers
10. Strings and Characters
10.1 String and Character Basics
10.2 The Predicates for Strings
10.3 Creating Strings
10.4 The Predicates for Characters
10.5 Character Codes
10.6 Comparison of Characters and Strings
10.7 Conversion of Characters and Strings
10.8 Modifying Strings
10.9 String Properties
10.10 Formatting Strings
10.11 Character Case
10.12 The Case Table
10.13 The Char Table
10.13.1 Char Table Types
10.13.2 Working With Char Tables
11. Lists
11.1 Lists and Cons Cells
11.2 Lists as Linked Pairs of Boxes
11.3 Predicates on Lists
11.4 Accessing Elements of Lists
11.5 Building Cons Cells and Lists
11.6 Modifying Existing List Structure
11.6.1 Altering List Elements with setcar
11.6.2 Altering the CDR of a List
11.6.3 Functions that Rearrange Lists
11.7 Using Lists as Sets
11.8 Association Lists
11.9 Property Lists
11.9.1 Working With Normal Plists
11.9.2 Working With Lax Plists
11.9.3 Converting Plists To/From Alists
11.10 Weak Lists
12. Sequences, Arrays, and Vectors
12.1 Sequences
12.2 Arrays
12.3 Functions that Operate on Arrays
12.4 Vectors
12.5 Functions That Operate on Vectors
12.6 Bit Vectors
12.7 Functions That Operate on Bit Vectors
13. Symbols
13.1 Symbol Components
13.2 Defining Symbols
13.3 Creating and Interning Symbols
13.4 Symbol Properties
13.4.1 Property Lists and Association Lists
13.4.2 Property List Functions for Objects
13.4.3 Property Lists Not Associated with Objects
14. Evaluation
14.1 Introduction to Evaluation
14.2 Eval
14.3 Kinds of Forms
14.3.1 Self-Evaluating Forms
14.3.2 Symbol Forms
14.3.3 Classification of List Forms
14.3.4 Symbol Function Indirection
14.3.5 Evaluation of Function Forms
14.3.6 Lisp Macro Evaluation
14.3.7 Special Operators
14.3.8 Autoloading
14.4 Quoting
14.5 Multiple values
15. Control Structures
15.1 Sequencing
15.2 Conditionals
15.3 Constructs for Combining Conditions
15.4 Iteration
15.5 Nonlocal Exits
15.5.1 Explicit Nonlocal Exits: catch and throw
15.5.2 Examples of catch and throw
15.5.3 Errors
15.5.3.1 How to Signal an Error
15.5.3.2 How XEmacs Processes Errors
15.5.3.3 Writing Code to Handle Errors
15.5.3.4 Error Symbols and Condition Names
15.5.4 Cleaning Up from Nonlocal Exits
16. Variables
16.1 Global Variables
16.2 Variables That Never Change
16.3 Local Variables
16.4 When a Variable is "Void"
16.5 Defining Global Variables
16.6 Accessing Variable Values
16.7 How to Alter a Variable Value
16.8 Scoping Rules for Variable Bindings
16.8.1 Scope
16.8.2 Extent
16.8.3 Implementation of Dynamic Scoping
16.8.4 Proper Use of Dynamic Scoping
16.9 Buffer-Local Variables
16.9.1 Introduction to Buffer-Local Variables
16.9.2 Creating and Deleting Buffer-Local Bindings
16.9.3 The Default Value of a Buffer-Local Variable
16.10 Variable Aliases
17. Functions and Commands
17.1 What Is a Function?
17.2 Lambda Expressions
17.2.1 Components of a Lambda Expression
17.2.2 A Simple Lambda-Expression Example
17.2.3 Advanced Features of Argument Lists
17.2.4 Documentation Strings of Functions
17.3 Naming a Function
17.4 Defining Functions
17.5 Calling Functions
17.6 Mapping Functions
17.7 Anonymous Functions
17.8 Accessing Function Cell Contents
17.9 Inline Functions
17.10 Other Topics Related to Functions
18. Macros
18.1 A Simple Example of a Macro
18.2 Expansion of a Macro Call
18.3 Macros and Byte Compilation
18.4 Defining Macros
18.5 Backquote
18.6 Common Problems Using Macros
18.6.1 Evaluating Macro Arguments Repeatedly
18.6.2 Local Variables in Macro Expansions
18.6.3 Evaluating Macro Arguments in Expansion
18.6.4 How Many Times is the Macro Expanded?
19. Writing Customization Definitions
19.1 Common Keywords for All Kinds of Items
19.2 Defining Custom Groups
19.3 Defining Customization Variables
19.4 Face Definitions
19.5 Customization Types
19.5.1 Simple Types
19.5.2 Composite Types
19.5.3 Splicing into Lists
19.5.4 Type Keywords
19.5.5 Enabling Behavior
19.5.6 Defining New Types
20. Loading
20.1 How Programs Do Loading
20.2 Autoload
20.3 Repeated Loading
20.4 Features
20.5 Unloading
20.6 Hooks for Loading
21. Byte Compilation
21.1 Performance of Byte-Compiled Code
21.2 The Compilation Functions
21.3 Options for the Byte Compiler
21.4 Documentation Strings and Compilation
21.5 Dynamic Loading of Individual Functions
21.6 Evaluation During Compilation
21.7 Compiled-Function Objects
21.8 Disassembled Byte-Code
21.9 Different Behavior
22. Debugging Lisp Programs
22.1 The Lisp Debugger
22.1.1 Entering the Debugger on an Error
22.1.2 Debugging Infinite Loops
22.1.3 Entering the Debugger on a Function Call
22.1.4 Explicit Entry to the Debugger
22.1.5 Using the Debugger
22.1.6 Debugger Commands
22.1.7 Invoking the Debugger
22.1.8 Internals of the Debugger
22.2 Debugging Invalid Lisp Syntax
22.2.1 Excess Open Parentheses
22.2.2 Excess Close Parentheses
22.3 Debugging Problems in Compilation
22.4 Edebug
22.4.1 Using Edebug
22.4.2 Instrumenting for Edebug
22.4.3 Edebug Execution Modes
22.4.4 Jumping
22.4.5 Miscellaneous
22.4.6 Breakpoints
22.4.6.1 Global Break Condition
22.4.6.2 Embedded Breakpoints
22.4.7 Trapping Errors
22.4.8 Edebug Views
22.4.9 Evaluation
22.4.10 Evaluation List Buffer
22.4.11 Reading in Edebug
22.4.12 Printing in Edebug
22.4.13 Tracing
22.4.14 Coverage Testing
22.4.15 The Outside Context
22.4.15.1 Checking Whether to Stop
22.4.15.2 Edebug Display Update
22.4.15.3 Edebug Recursive Edit
22.4.16 Instrumenting Macro Calls
22.4.16.1 Specification List
22.4.16.2 Backtracking
22.4.16.3 Debugging Backquote
22.4.16.4 Specification Examples
22.4.17 Edebug Options
23. Reading and Printing Lisp Objects
23.1 Introduction to Reading and Printing
23.2 Input Streams
23.3 Input Functions
23.4 Output Streams
23.5 Output Functions
23.6 Variables Affecting Output
24. Minibuffers
24.1 Introduction to Minibuffers
24.2 Reading Text Strings with the Minibuffer
24.3 Reading Lisp Objects with the Minibuffer
24.4 Minibuffer History
24.5 Completion
24.5.1 Basic Completion Functions
24.5.2 Completion and the Minibuffer
24.5.3 Minibuffer Commands That Do Completion
24.5.4 High-Level Completion Functions
24.5.5 Reading File Names
24.5.6 Programmed Completion
24.6 Yes-or-No Queries
24.7 Asking Multiple Y-or-N Questions
24.8 Reading a Password
24.9 Minibuffer Miscellany
25. Command Loop
25.1 Command Loop Overview
25.2 Defining Commands
25.2.1 Using interactive
25.2.2 Code Characters for interactive
25.2.3 Examples of Using interactive
25.3 Interactive Call
25.4 Information from the Command Loop
25.5 Events
25.5.1 Event Types
25.5.2 Contents of the Different Types of Events
25.5.3 Event Predicates
25.5.4 Accessing the Position of a Mouse Event
25.5.4.1 Frame-Level Event Position Info
25.5.4.2 Window-Level Event Position Info
25.5.4.3 Event Text Position Info
25.5.4.4 Event Glyph Position Info
25.5.4.5 Event Toolbar Position Info
25.5.4.6 Other Event Position Info
25.5.5 Accessing the Other Contents of Events
25.5.6 Working With Events
25.5.7 Converting Events
25.6 Reading Input
25.6.1 Key Sequence Input
25.6.2 Reading One Event
25.6.3 Dispatching an Event
25.6.4 Quoted Character Input
25.6.5 Miscellaneous Event Input Features
25.7 Waiting for Elapsed Time or Input
25.8 Quitting
25.9 Prefix Command Arguments
25.10 Recursive Editing
25.11 Disabling Commands
25.12 Command History
25.13 Keyboard Macros
26. Keymaps
26.1 Keymap Terminology
26.2 Format of Keymaps
26.3 Creating Keymaps
26.4 Inheritance and Keymaps
26.5 Key Sequences
26.6 Prefix Keys
26.7 Active Keymaps
26.8 Key Lookup
26.9 Functions for Key Lookup
26.10 Changing Key Bindings
26.11 Commands for Binding Keys
26.12 Scanning Keymaps
26.13 Other Keymap Functions
27. Menus
27.1 Format of Menus
27.2 Format of the Menubar
27.3 Menubar
27.4 Modifying Menus
27.5 Menu Filters
27.6 Pop-Up Menus
27.7 Menu Accelerators
27.7.1 Creating Menu Accelerators
27.7.2 Keyboard Menu Traversal
27.7.3 Menu Accelerator Functions
27.8 Buffers Menu
28. Dialog Boxes
28.1 Dialog Box Format
28.2 Dialog Box Functions
29. Toolbar
29.1 Toolbar Intro
29.2 Creating Toolbar
29.3 Toolbar Descriptor Format
29.4 Specifying the Toolbar
29.5 Other Toolbar Variables
30. Gutter
30.1 Gutter Intro
30.2 Creating Gutters
30.3 Specifying a Gutter
30.4 Other Gutter Variables
30.5 Common Gutter Widgets
30.5.1 Buffer Tabs
30.5.2 Progress Bars
31. Scrollbars
32. Drag and Drop
32.1 Supported Protocols
32.1.1 CDE dt
32.1.2 MSWindows OLE
32.1.3 Loose ends
32.2 Drop Interface
32.3 Drag Interface
33. Major and Minor Modes
33.1 Major Modes
33.1.1 Major Mode Conventions
33.1.2 Major Mode Examples
33.1.3 How XEmacs Chooses a Major Mode
33.1.4 Getting Help about a Major Mode
33.1.5 Defining Derived Modes
33.2 Minor Modes
33.2.1 Conventions for Writing Minor Modes
33.2.2 Keymaps and Minor Modes
33.3 Modeline Format
33.3.1 The Data Structure of the Modeline
33.3.2 Variables Used in the Modeline
33.3.3 %-Constructs in the ModeLine
33.4 Hooks
34. Documentation
34.1 Documentation Basics
34.2 Access to Documentation Strings
34.3 Substituting Key Bindings in Documentation
34.4 Describing Characters for Help Messages
34.5 Help Functions
34.6 Obsoleteness
35. Files
35.1 Visiting Files
35.1.1 Functions for Visiting Files
35.1.2 Subroutines of Visiting
35.2 Saving Buffers
35.3 Reading from Files
35.4 Writing to Files
35.5 File Locks
35.6 Information about Files
35.6.1 Testing Accessibility
35.6.2 Distinguishing Kinds of Files
35.6.3 Truenames
35.6.4 Other Information about Files
35.7 Changing File Names and Attributes
35.8 File Names
35.8.1 File Name Components
35.8.2 Directory Names
35.8.3 Absolute and Relative File Names
35.8.4 Functions that Expand Filenames
35.8.5 Generating Unique File Names
35.8.6 File Name Completion
35.8.7 User Name Completion
35.9 Contents of Directories
35.10 Creating and Deleting Directories
35.11 Making Certain File Names "Magic"
35.12 Partial Files
35.12.1 Intro to Partial Files
35.12.2 Creating a Partial File
35.12.3 Detached Partial Files
35.13 File Format Conversion
35.14 Files and MS-DOS
36. Backups and Auto-Saving
36.1 Backup Files
36.1.1 Making Backup Files
36.1.2 Backup by Renaming or by Copying?
36.1.3 Making and Deleting Numbered Backup Files
36.1.4 Naming Backup Files
36.2 Auto-Saving
36.3 Reverting
37. Buffers
37.1 Buffer Basics
37.2 The Current Buffer
37.3 Buffer Names
37.4 Buffer File Name
37.5 Buffer Modification
37.6 Comparison of Modification Time
37.7 Read-Only Buffers
37.8 The Buffer List
37.9 Creating Buffers
37.10 Killing Buffers
37.11 Indirect Buffers
38. Windows
38.1 Basic Concepts of Emacs Windows
38.2 Splitting Windows
38.3 Deleting Windows
38.4 Selecting Windows
38.5 Cyclic Ordering of Windows
38.6 Buffers and Windows
38.7 Displaying Buffers in Windows
38.8 Choosing a Window for Display
38.9 Windows and Point
38.10 The Window Start Position
38.11 Vertical Scrolling
38.12 Horizontal Scrolling
38.13 The Size of a Window
38.14 The Position of a Window
38.15 Changing the Size of a Window
38.16 Window Configurations
39. Frames
39.1 Creating Frames
39.2 Frame Properties
39.2.1 Access to Frame Properties
39.2.2 Initial Frame Properties
39.2.3 X Window Frame Properties
39.2.4 Frame Size And Position
39.2.5 The Name of a Frame (As Opposed to Its Title)
39.3 Frame Titles
39.4 Deleting Frames
39.5 Finding All Frames
39.6 Frames and Windows
39.7 Minibuffers and Frames
39.8 Input Focus
39.9 Visibility of Frames
39.10 Raising and Lowering Frames
39.11 Frame Configurations
39.12 Hooks for Customizing Frame Behavior
40. Consoles and Devices
40.1 Basic Console Functions
40.2 Basic Device Functions
40.3 Console Types and Device Classes
40.4 Connecting to a Console or Device
40.5 The Selected Console and Device
40.6 Console and Device I/O
41. Positions
41.1 Point
41.2 Motion
41.2.1 Motion by Characters
41.2.2 Motion by Words
41.2.3 Motion to an End of the Buffer
41.2.4 Motion by Text Lines
41.2.5 Motion by Screen Lines
41.2.6 Moving over Balanced Expressions
41.2.7 Skipping Characters
41.3 Excursions
41.4 Narrowing
42. Markers
42.1 Overview of Markers
42.2 Predicates on Markers
42.3 Functions That Create Markers
42.4 Information from Markers
42.5 Changing Marker Positions
42.6 The Mark
42.7 The Region
43. Text
43.1 Examining Text Near Point
43.2 Examining Buffer Contents
43.3 Comparing Text
43.4 Inserting Text
43.5 User-Level Insertion Commands
43.6 Deleting Text
43.7 User-Level Deletion Commands
43.8 The Kill Ring
43.8.1 Kill Ring Concepts
43.8.2 Functions for Killing
43.8.3 Functions for Yanking
43.8.4 Low-Level Kill Ring
43.8.5 Internals of the Kill Ring
43.9 Undo
43.10 Maintaining Undo Lists
43.11 Filling
43.12 Margins for Filling
43.13 Auto Filling
43.14 Sorting Text
43.15 Counting Columns
43.16 Indentation
43.16.1 Indentation Primitives
43.16.2 Indentation Controlled by Major Mode
43.16.3 Indenting an Entire Region
43.16.4 Indentation Relative to Previous Lines
43.16.5 Adjustable "Tab Stops"
43.16.6 Indentation-Based Motion Commands
43.17 Case Changes
43.18 Text Properties
43.18.1 Examining Text Properties
43.18.2 Changing Text Properties
43.18.3 Property Search Functions
43.18.4 Properties with Special Meanings
43.18.5 Saving Text Properties in Files
43.18.6 Fields
43.19 Substituting for a Character Code
43.20 Registers
43.21 Transposition of Text
43.22 Change Hooks
43.23 Textual transformations--MD5 and base64 support
44. Searching and Matching
44.1 Searching for Strings
44.2 Regular Expressions
44.2.1 Syntax of Regular Expressions
44.2.2 Complex Regexp Example
44.3 Regular Expression Searching
44.4 POSIX Regular Expression Searching
44.5 Search and Replace
44.6 The Match Data
44.6.1 Simple Match Data Access
44.6.2 Replacing the Text That Matched
44.6.3 Accessing the Entire Match Data
44.6.4 Saving and Restoring the Match Data
44.7 Searching and Case
44.8 Standard Regular Expressions Used in Editing
45. Syntax Tables
45.1 Syntax Table Concepts
45.2 Syntax Descriptors
45.2.1 Table of Syntax Classes
45.2.2 Syntax Flags
45.3 Syntax Table Functions
45.4 Motion and Syntax
45.5 Parsing Balanced Expressions
45.6 Some Standard Syntax Tables
45.7 Syntax Table Internals
46. Abbrevs And Abbrev Expansion
46.1 Setting Up Abbrev Mode
46.2 Abbrev Tables
46.3 Defining Abbrevs
46.4 Saving Abbrevs in Files
46.5 Looking Up and Expanding Abbreviations
46.6 Standard Abbrev Tables
47. Extents
47.1 Introduction to Extents
47.2 Creating and Modifying Extents
47.3 Extent Endpoints
47.4 Finding Extents
47.5 Mapping Over Extents
47.6 Properties of Extents
47.7 Detached Extents
47.8 Extent Parents
47.9 Duplicable Extents
47.10 Interaction of Extents with Keyboard and Mouse Events
47.11 Atomic Extents
48. Specifiers
48.1 Introduction to Specifiers
48.2 Simple Specifier Usage
48.3 In-Depth Overview of a Specifier
48.4 How a Specifier Is Instantiated
48.5 Specifier Types
48.6 Adding specifications to a Specifier
48.7 Retrieving the Specifications from a Specifier
48.8 Working With Specifier Tags
48.9 Functions for Instantiating a Specifier
48.10 Examples of Specifier Usage
48.11 Creating New Specifier Objects
48.12 Functions for Checking the Validity of Specifier Components
48.13 Other Functions for Working with Specifications in a Specifier
48.14 Specifier Compatibility Notes
48.14.1 Compatibility with GNU Emacs
48.14.2 Backwards Compatibility with XEmacs 21.4
49. Faces and Window-System Objects
49.1 Faces
49.1.1 Merging Faces for Display
49.1.2 Basic Functions for Working with Faces
49.1.3 Face Properties
49.1.4 Face Convenience Functions
49.1.5 Other Face Display Functions
49.2 Fonts
49.2.1 Font Specifiers
49.2.2 Font Instances
49.2.3 Font Instance Names
49.2.4 Font Instance Size
49.2.5 Font Instance Characteristics
49.2.6 Font Convenience Functions
49.3 Colors
49.3.1 Color Specifiers
49.3.2 Color Instances
49.3.3 Color Instance Properties
49.3.4 Color Convenience Functions
50. Glyphs
50.1 Glyph Introduction
50.2 Images
50.2.1 Image Instantiators
50.2.2 Image Instantiator Conversion
50.2.3 Image Instantiator Formats
50.2.4 Image Instances
50.2.4.1 Image Instance Types
50.2.4.2 Image Instance Functions
50.3 Using Glyphs
50.3.1 Creating Glyphs
50.3.2 Buffer Glyphs
50.3.3 Redisplay Glyphs
50.3.4 Frame Glyphs
50.3.5 External Glyphs
50.3.6 Native GUI Widgets
50.3.6.1 Introduction to Native Widgets and Subwindow Glyphs
50.3.6.2 Lisp API to Native Widgets
50.3.6.3 Layouts
50.3.6.4 Primitive Widgets
50.3.7 Subwindows
50.4 Manipulating Glyphs
50.4.1 Glyph Properties
50.4.2 Glyph Convenience Functions
50.4.3 Glyph Dimensions
50.4.4 Glyph Types
50.5 Glyph Examples
51. Annotations
51.1 Annotation Basics
51.2 Annotation Primitives
51.3 Annotation Properties
51.4 Locating Annotations
51.5 Margin Primitives
51.6 Annotation Hooks
52. Emacs Display
52.1 Refreshing the Screen
52.2 Truncation
52.3 The Echo Area
52.3.1 Customizing Message Display
52.4 Warnings
52.5 Invisible Text
52.6 Selective Display
52.7 The Overlay Arrow
52.8 Temporary Displays
52.9 Blinking Parentheses
52.10 Usual Display Conventions
52.11 Display Tables
52.11.1 Display Table Format
52.11.2 Active Display Table
52.11.3 Character Descriptors
52.12 Beeping
53. Hash Tables
53.1 Introduction to Hash Tables
53.2 Working With Hash Tables
53.3 Weak Hash Tables
54. Range Tables
54.1 Introduction to Range Tables
54.2 Working With Range Tables
55. Databases
55.1 Connecting to a Database
55.2 Working With a Database
55.3 Other Database Functions
56. Processes
56.1 Functions that Create Subprocesses
56.2 Creating a Synchronous Process
56.3 MS-DOS Subprocesses
56.4 Creating an Asynchronous Process
56.5 Deleting Processes
56.6 Process Information
56.7 Sending Input to Processes
56.8 Sending Signals to Processes
56.9 Receiving Output from Processes
56.9.1 Process Buffers
56.9.2 Process Filter Functions
56.9.3 Accepting Output from Processes
56.10 Sentinels: Detecting Process Status Changes
56.11 Process Window Size
56.12 Transaction Queues
56.13 Network Connections
57. Operating System Interface
57.1 Starting Up XEmacs
57.1.1 Summary: Sequence of Actions at Start Up
57.1.2 The Init File: `.emacs'
57.1.3 Terminal-Specific Initialization
57.1.4 Command Line Arguments
57.2 Getting out of XEmacs
57.2.1 Killing XEmacs
57.2.2 Suspending XEmacs
57.3 Operating System Environment
57.4 User Identification
57.5 Time of Day
57.6 Time Conversion
57.7 Timers for Delayed Execution
57.8 Terminal Input
57.8.1 Input Modes
57.8.2 Translating Input Events
57.8.3 Recording Input
57.9 Terminal Output
57.10 Flow Control
57.11 Batch Mode
58. Functions Specific to the X Window System
58.1 X Selections
58.2 X Server
58.2.1 Resources
58.2.2 Data about the X Server
58.2.3 Restricting Access to the Server by Other Apps
58.3 Miscellaneous X Functions and Variables
59. ToolTalk Support
59.1 XEmacs ToolTalk API Summary
59.2 Sending Messages
59.2.1 Example of Sending Messages
59.2.2 Elisp Interface for Sending Messages
59.3 Receiving Messages
59.3.1 Example of Receiving Messages
59.3.2 Elisp Interface for Receiving Messages
60. LDAP Support
60.1 Building XEmacs with LDAP support
60.2 XEmacs LDAP API
60.2.1 LDAP Variables
60.2.2 The High-Level LDAP API
60.2.3 The Low-Level LDAP API
60.2.3.1 The LDAP Lisp Object
60.2.3.2 Opening and Closing a LDAP Connection
60.2.3.3 Low-level Operations on a LDAP Server
60.2.4 LDAP Internationalization
60.2.4.1 LDAP Internationalization Variables
60.2.4.2 Encoder/Decoder Functions
60.3 Syntax of Search Filters
61. PostgreSQL Support
61.1 Building XEmacs with PostgreSQL support
61.2 XEmacs PostgreSQL libpq API
61.2.1 libpq Lisp Variables
61.2.2 libpq Lisp Symbols and Datatypes
61.2.3 Synchronous Interface Functions
61.2.4 Asynchronous Interface Functions
61.2.5 Large Object Support
61.2.6 Other libpq Functions
61.2.7 Unimplemented libpq Functions
61.3 XEmacs PostgreSQL libpq Examples
62. Internationalization
62.1 I18N Levels 1 and 2
62.2 I18N Level 3
62.2.1 Level 3 Basics
62.2.2 Level 3 Primitives
62.2.3 Dynamic Messaging
62.2.4 Domain Specification
62.3 I18N Level 4
63. MULE
63.1 Internationalization Terminology
63.2 Charsets
63.2.1 Charset Properties
63.2.2 Basic Charset Functions
63.2.3 Charset Property Functions
63.2.4 Predefined Charsets
63.3 MULE Characters
63.4 Composite Characters
63.5 Coding Systems
63.5.1 Coding System Types
63.6 ISO 2022
63.6.1 EOL Conversion
63.6.2 Coding System Properties
63.6.3 Basic Coding System Functions
63.6.4 Coding System Property Functions
63.6.5 Encoding and Decoding Text
63.6.6 Detection of Textual Encoding
63.6.7 Big5 and Shift-JIS Functions
63.6.8 Coding Systems Implemented
63.7 CCL
63.7.1 CCL Syntax
63.7.2 CCL Statements
63.7.3 CCL Expressions
63.7.4 Calling CCL
63.7.5 CCL Example
63.7.5.1 Four bits to ASCII
63.7.5.2 URI Encoding constants
63.7.5.3 Numeric to ASCII-hexadecimal conversion
63.7.5.4 Characters to be preserved
63.7.5.5 The program to decode to internal format
63.7.5.6 The program to encode from internal format
63.7.5.7 The actual coding system
63.8 Category Tables
63.9 Unicode Support
63.10 Character Set Unification
63.10.1 An Overview of Unification
63.10.2 Operation of Unification
63.11 Basic Functionality
63.12 Interactive Usage
63.12.1 Configuring Unification for Use
63.12.2 Theory of Operation
63.12.3 What Unification Cannot Do for You
63.12.4 Internals
63.12.5 Charsets and Coding Systems
A. Tips and Standards
A.1 Writing Clean Lisp Programs
A.2 Tips for Making Compiled Code Fast
A.3 Tips for Documentation Strings
A.4 Tips on Writing Comments
A.5 Conventional Headers for XEmacs Libraries
B. Building XEmacs; Allocation of Objects
B.1 Building XEmacs
B.2 Garbage Collection
C. Standard Errors
D. Buffer-Local Variables
E. Standard Keymaps
F. Standard Hooks
Index


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